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of several historical novels he spoke for a little more than an hour in jackson, mississippi. >> the reason for me to be in jackson maybe more so than any other is what took place 40 miles west of here and that is what i want to talk about tonight. at vicksburg, so this is quite a story and even some people around here don't know it. that is great fun for me but i need to start out talking about something that i always mention whenever i'm doing any event like this. i am quite sure that at least some of you have some interest in the civil war for one reason, because at of some time many years ago perhaps you read a book called the killer angels. every time i say that i see people nod their heads. you have no idea what the killer angels is that's okay. it's not required. i'll explain it to you quickly. the killer angels was written by my father and came out in 1974. it is the story of the battle of gettysburg. now with the killer angels is not is the history of the battle of gettysburg. it's not a history book. it's the story as told to you from the characters themselves and not just any cha
-- i'm sure other people have those influences, but being born in memphis, tennessee on the mississippi river, and having made my living playing down there on beale street, those particular elements created this booker t. jones style. tavis: so you know a bit about my back story. i know more about yours. but the reason why i love this instrument so much, this hammond b-3, is because long before i'd ever heard of ray charles, long before i heard of jimmy smith, i'm a kid growing up in a pentecostal church. >> oh, i see. tavis: so i fall in love with -- and i was choir director when i was -- people don't know this, but i was choir director of two choirs for years at my pentecostal church, -- [indiscernible] -- in indiana. so i fell in love with this instrument through the church. i raise that because you mentioned ray charles earlier, as did i, for that matter. but ray had a moment in his career where he was catching hell, for lack of a better phrase, for taking that instrument and taking that sound >> absolutely. tavis: and secularizing it. >> absolutely. tavis: did you have a similar jo
, who recently had some heart treatment. let's go to mississippi. laura from ocean springs, mississippi. i am 45 years old. when barack obama talked about education. they discussed how blacks and whites could not go to the same school. thes a graduate from university of south alabama. i was able to graduate from there with a bachelors. >> what did you get your degree in? >> i got my degree in exercise science. work on atrying to masters, but i have been sick. i will have surgery in september. i will try to finish up with a masters in education. >> good luck to you, thank you for joining us. florida, next up. >> how are you doing? listen, i wanted to commend you guys and congratulate you for an awesome broadcast. such a remarkable speech by such a remarkable character. encourage.mber to some of the members of congress commenting about the days activities. here here is senator casey from pennsylvania. this is kay granger of texas. what dreams do you have for your country? the culmination of a movement that began here in montgomery 50 years before. here is california, good evening, stephen
in mississippi. and i think part of it was that these young idealistic college students wanted to understand these people, not as abstractions, not as enemies, not as human beings and that's exactly why -- what agee accomplishes but the other thing they were drawn to was that it showed them how to live without armor. it showed them how to live according to the principles without compromise. i teach "let us now praise famous men," or try to do my freshman and they hate it. i don't care. [laughter] because there are a couple of every semester t who did it and it's worth it but it's worth it. and "let us now praise famous men," as many of yo you know, is a book that you can't get past the first few pages or it changes your life. and i think in the early '60s there were people who wanted to change, who were eager for the change. and "let us now praise famous men" really spoke to that. >> is it true, agee's reputation as you say, the book itself is a commercial and more or less political flaw but he did live in new york and he had friends, and some of them talked to them. irving howe, paul goodma
every hill and molehill of mississippi and from every mountain side. . i'm angela, and i didn't think i could quit smoking but chantix helped me do it. i told my doctor i think i'm... i'm ready. [ male announcer ] along with support, chantix (varenicline) is proven to help people quit smoking. it reduces the urge to smoke. i knew that i could smoke for the first 7 days. i knew that i wasn't putting nicotine back into my body to try to quit. [ male announcer ] some people had changes in behavior, thinking or mood, hostility, agitation, depressed mood and suicidal thoughts or actions while taking or after stopping chantix. if you notice any of these, stop chantix and call your doctor right away. tell your doctor about any history of mental health problems, which could get worse while taking chantix. don't take chantix if you've had a serious allergic or skin reaction to it. if you develop these, sp chantix and see your doctor right away as some can be life-threatening. tell your doctor if you have a history of heart or blood vessel problems, or if you develop new or worse symptoms. get me
's that for a variety of weather. ? temperatures now at 94 at dallas. 93 attacks in mississippi. look at the cooler air and a pool of ear infections of ontario. quite interesting. a high yesterday. the key here has been extraordinary. that is not uncommon in texas to have long strings of warm weather. this has been persistent heat. for us we are in the sun and watching this field of cumulus clouds. those are the ones that might produce scattered thunderstorms. look at this we have had 2.96 in. of rain since july. the normal is quite a bit more than that. this ranks among the driest 27% all year since july 1st to occur here in 142 years of data. only 64% of average. that is why we have been hearing from folks that it is a little bit dry. rainfall projections but is around half an inch. the amounts never fall evenly. that is assault normal amount of rent. and this summer that has also been a little cooler than average. 6.7 degrees cooler than last summer. only 7¢ a degree below the historic average for summer. it has been a near normal for summer. it seems cool. june july and august have all shown sligh
every hill of mississippi and from every mountainside. let freedom ring, and when it happens, when we allow freedom to ring, when we let it ring from every village and from every state and every city we will be able to speed up the day that all of us black men and white men choose power and we will be able to join hands and sing in the old spirit of free at last, free at last. thank god almighty we are free at last. [applause] >> on a sunday morning in september of 1963, for young black girls attended sunday school at the 16th st. storch church. the bible lesson was a love that for dallas. the girl moved to the basement when suddenly an always went through the church like a cannon. the bomb planted near the basement went through the house of worship. they toppled a gruesome discovery. sandia, age 14, carroll robertson, age 14. addy mae colins and denise age 11 all were found dead, their bodies buried atop one another. >> it's great to be visible all through dallas. >> it will only be a matter of minutes before he arrives at the turnpike. >> they got in the newsroom and as perhaps you
songs. ?let freedom ring." from stone mountain of georgia, and every hill of mississippi. there was one place that dr. king did not mention, about which he later spoke of. that was the district of columbia. that is because full freedom and democracy were and are still denied to the people who quite literally live within the site of the capitol dome. our city is home to more residents than the state of vermont and wyoming. but we have no voting representative in our own congress. we pay more than $3.5 billion a year in federal taxes. we don't even get the final say over how we spend our own locally raised money. we send our sons and daughters to fight for democracy overseas, but don't get to practice it fully here at home. today, as we remember those who gave so much have a century ago to extend the blessings of liberty to all americans, i implore and hope that all of you will stand with me when i say that we must let freedom ring from mount saint alban, where rises the majestic national cathedral. we must let freedom ring from the bridges of anacostia. we must let freedom ring from capi
down the mississippi filled with bales of hay for grant's horses. the barge set out at night, so the confederates wouldn't see it. but, unfortunately, it was a night with a full moon, and it was really quite visible, and the confederates fired cannons at it. one of the shells hit the barge, exploded, killed about a dozen union soldiers, set the hay on fire, and junius and albert jumped into the river and attempted to float away. but the confederates sut boats and captu th and imprisoned them in various prisons for the next 20 months. and then they escaped from a prison in salisbury, north carolina, and with the help of slaves and pro-union bush whackers walked 300 miles over the appalachians to the union lines. so i read this, which was only about as long as what i've just said, and i thought to myself, wow, that would make a great movie. unfortunately, i don't make movies. but occasionally i do write books. so i thought, well, should i write a book about these guys? i suppose if i was a novelist, that little synopsis would have been enough, and i just could have made up the rest
on the death list in mississippi and he took it upon himself to train our children what to do in case they heard gunfire. that's exactly what they did that night. each other helped each other to the bathroom to get in the tub and my screams stopped them from completing that hiding point. but we knew, you live with death threats constantly and you adapt your life to that. you might argue, but you don't leave without the embrace. you might become angry with things that are happening around you, but it's a time of support. it's a time of pulling people together. and during that time, we had the ages divided. there were the young people and there were the older people. those in the middle were more or less teachers who were a little afraid to speak up and stand out. medgarr stood alone in that battle. he did have supporters, of course, but he was the point person and it was extremely difficult for us as a family to live with that. but you lived as though every day was going to be your last together. it sounds a little sad but that's the way it was. >> one of your themes in your speech on
the mississippi, in the middle of no place. a lot of these warehouses are in industrial wasteland areas. people commute from nearby cities from all over. the warehouse i was working in had thousands of people in it. since it was the run-up to christmas, they were hiring 4000 additional temporary workers just for the last four months of the year. from the moment i arrived in town, even before i got to the warehouse, i stopped at the local chamber of commerce, and they told me, do not stop crying and do not take what happens to you personally. it is a very ugly scene in their beer there are lots of people who would be willing to take your job because the economy is so bad, so basically put up with what ever they throw at you and leave your dignity at the door. that is what i did and that is what everyone else there did. >> could you talked about what prompted you to get this temporary job, had they become interested in conditions in these types of warehouses? >> i had done another story about the death of the middle class in ohio in the run-up to governor kasich's budget cuts that he was doing, s
are on alert in the mississippi river valley where continued heavy rain could trigger intense flooding. brian is live for us with more. >> reporter: much of the midwest and southeast is pummeled by torrential rains and ten inches of rain falling on friday flooding hundreds of homes and businesses in states like colorado, kansas, missouri and tennessee. floodwaters sweeping through roads and highways in colorado. 1.3 inches of rain following in only half an hour causing this fast moving mudslide along highway 24 killing a man. muddy water carrying homes and debris. three others are still missing. listen to this woman who held on to dear life as the home rushed right by her. >> at that moment i knew that the water was getting higher and coming over it. then the bottom broke off and it went through. i said i have to get out of here. i was screaming for help and i watched them rescue a dog. i watched the house go by. i watched cars go by. >> reporter: missouri, 15 inches of rain in two-day period. in some areas in southwestern parts of the state, floods killing a four-year-old boy and his mother
of quebec. who first discovered the following places, florida, pacific ocean, the mississippi river, the st. lawrence river? >> you don't know who won the battle of quebec? >> yes, no, i don't. >> where did you go to school? >> i don't even know who was fighting in the battle of quebec. >>> we do have some news this morning. coming up. developing story out of michigan, the doctor accused of trying to profit by allegedly mistreating cancer patients. the feds have raided his office. what his lawyer is saying this morning. >> this has allegedly been going on for years. >>> on a happier note, he's the nfl's oldest rookie. he's 28 years old. after serving time for a crime he didn't commit, brian banks is finally getting a shot at his nfl dream. so many people rooting for him. >> i love this story and his attitude is extraordinary. you'll hear from him coming up. >>> and in these dog days of summer, you may have seen the infomercials for the items such as the chillow. that's a pillow that keeps your head cool while you sleep. this morning mom testers are back putting as seen on tv products throug
't rainfall amounts in the mid atlantic and parts of the lower mississippi valley and even to the plains. that includes oklahoma city. that cold front is going to bring a nice change out there. the cold air is dipping in from the north. that means temperatures for some parts are going to run-about 10 degrees below average. you will say, is ill really still august? temperatures in the 70s. yes. that's what we're expect, tuesday, wednesday, once that front passes, typically temperatures in throw 80s an parts of the south as well. >> it's good for the kids. the kids won't feel so bad about starting school now. >> yes, they will. i feel bad for them. >> come on! be excited about school, kids. >>> in the meantime if you look up in certain parts, you will see a meteor shower, tell us about that. >> these are images from last year. we're talking the peak viewing is tonight as well as tomorrow. these are the images and you're looking at the meteors and the debris. once that starts to hit the atmosphere, that's when you start to see it trailing and burning up. when they hit the earth they move at
. , james is ini ocean springs, and he supports same-sex marriage. >> yes, and mississippi, of .ourse, does not recognize i am originally from louisiana, and it is not recognized. but just like all other civil progress, the south as far behind. it will take some time to reach it, but we will eventually get there. lived inng have you mississippi? >> just over a year. of the time i spent in louisiana and i lived in baileys, central america, for the last five years before e,ming to mississippi -- beliz central america, for the last five years before coming to mississippi. >> mark, go ahead with your comment. thismain point to all of is, we live in a great country and everybody has the right to be wrong. everybody has the right to be right. what we have here is a battle over semantics, i think. can be think the union called marriage because marriage is a sacrament. it is sacred. it is holy. , a homosexual marriage, is sodomy. that is not holy. that is an unholy union. if you want to go ahead and have the government take care of all of your finances and everything after you die, then call it som
it was just the way i was cultivated -- i don't know, it was just the way i was cultivated. mississippi was always a scary place because emmett till was murdered there. , when i go south i still remember that i am black, and i wonder if people will see anything, and all they ever say -- all they ever say is, "y'all come back, you hear," or "we wish you were president, bill." it always stuns me. i'm gun shy because of how i was brought up. but we had a wonderful time in west virginia. michael in alabama is calling on our republican line. hello, i would like to say about race, you know, every time a black person kills a white person, it's ok, but if a white person kills a black person, they set out to do it as a race thing. it's not a race thing all the time. we are past all that now. we need to learn to love each other and accept people for who complaining -- guest: who was complaining? well, i mean, the blacks always complain -- why don't you think we are explaining our circumstances? caller: well, they just complain -- you know, get over what happened in the past. south.you are from th
klux klan skyrockets, you have the mississippi codes, which began in 1877 and were crystallized in 1901. it deprived blacks of being able to own property. restricts voting rights. for example, in mississippi. and i think in 1871, 97% of african-american men can vote in the state of mississippi. when hayes and's reconstruction, 10 years later, less than 1.5% of african-american men can the.the violence, intimidation, the grandfather's clause, the poll tax. it is really two separate nations where african-americans emboldened by frederick douglass in the north began to really organize and begin to secure the rights while the south have theirs stripped away.>> mike is watching us in honolulu. you are on. go ahead. >> can you hear me? >> yes, thanks. >> it is hawaii standard time. i have a direct relative to my grandmother, of course.her name is jesse hayes. she was born in 1870. in the lower midwest.probably, by blood, long removed. i looked at this beautiful lucy sitting in the chair, looking at the camera with those big eyes, and her beautiful children looking at the camera. obviously,mpr
is violence. >> keenan leaks of jackson, mississippi, once thought it was impossible for black students to be falling so short in education. >> ask the kids in my neighbor hood and the parents and coming to find out there was a 70% dropout rate in the neighborhood. parents want a choice. even poor parents want a choice. why should only rich children have a choice? >> the work is being applauded not only by parents, students and businesses but also politicians and gospel recording artist marvin sapp. >> when we see how we are using our young children at an alarming rate, i believe that somebody needs to step to the plate. you know what, i take that challenge of trying to bring about change. >> i'm a doctor, phd, coming out of a housing project in milwaukee, wisconsin. the only thing that got me to the point you and i are having this interview is an education. >> power of an education for dr. howard fuller is the power of faith. he acknowledges there is still a lot of work that needs to be done. >> getting message out. one of the best ways i have ever heard. thank you. >>> president obama
's day that bridge collapsed in the middle of the mississippi river. as i said, that day, a bridge just shouldn't fall down in the middle of america. not an eight-lane bridge in the middle of rush hour and not a bridge six blocks from my house. that's what happened. 13 people were killed. hundreds were injured. you know what we do when it does break down, when that happens in america? we rebuild. we rebuilt that bridge less than 13 months. we rebuilt like they're rebuilding in new jersey after hurricane sandy. we rebuild like you did in iowa after the iowa floods. we rebuild because that's what a good government does. it funds public safety and infrastructure and it doesn't shortchange our roads and our bridges and our locks and our dams. so where do you think the senate passed bipartisan water bill, the water resources development act. where do you think it is? it's is it you can in the house of representatives another example. after decades of immigrants living in the shadows, kids who lived in our military denied citizenship. engineers and doctors and scientists denied industry. the
to where we're dealing with the rainy weather in mississippi. tupelo today, scattered storms in the forecast. yes, your blue suede shoes, elvis from tupelo, mississippi. the worst of the weather by far right over the top of kansas city. if you're down from interstate 70 or down to arkansas that's where the heavy rain will be from showers and storms. we're looking dry in the west. this weather pattern hasn't changed for three or four weeks. hot and dry in the west and in the east relatively cool and every now and then just like >> good morning.g y.ppy monda the sun breaking out with spotty showers possible. >>> that's your monday forecast. savannah, david. >> thank you so much. coming up next, trending, while the name sake of amelia earhart recreating her flight has explaining to do this morning. >> tracy morgan will give us a tour of his shark themed man cave. it's outrageous. first, these messages. to help pay for the road trip... before they earned 1% back on all purchases -- everywhere, every time -- and 2% back at the grocery store... even before earning 3% back on gas, w
-- guest: the idea is that each state is supposed to have one. it is problematic in some seo --mississippi, in some oun -- some states and counties, there may only be one. there are multistate plans, which we haven't mentioned before. the people who designed the law and who wrote it foresaw the chance that in some parts of the country there might not be sufficient competition. there are provisions to have at least one nonprofit of the state plan and one for-profit of the state plan. they are still being implemented now. they are not likely to be rolled out on a national basis, as was the original intention. --t there are other backstops they are another backstop intended to bring in more competition into states that may be lacking them. another is the co-ops. the federal government, the law provided large subsidies to set up brand-new insurance companies in some states. typically these are blue states like maryland, california -- guest: they were stopped midstride. they got defunded. guest: so it won't be in every state. but the point is that there may be limits to competition and that is
down to alabama and mississippi and tennessee to unionized those work places with the new german model. tracy: they want to have a decision team that sits on the company's board? it sounds crazy. >> also work councils and different groups like that and they say it works in germany but those jobs have moved from tennessee -- from germany to tennessee and their growth rate has them lower than ours even a we have not had a very good growth rate recently as 1.7% tracy: i understand the logic. they come to tennessee purposely because it is right to work not to do with the union nonsense but said the union thinks we can convince them otherwise? >> exactly also the auto companies and the south are adding workers nissan has 5,000 and one to add another 2,000. of they are expanding by at jeep is moving to new china for the export market not even expanding in ohio to one that is crazy but your point that membership has fallen with 11 percent of the work force in the unit is down from 20%. >> and only 6 percent of private-sector workers are in the union right ow. tracy: what is the incentive to
, mississippi, marie, democratic caller in mississippi. the future of the democratic arty at this point, hiller -- hillary clinton is the sole standing. who she will take with her, that is questionable. she does not have much of a selection to choose from. after listening to her speech at the bar, it just reminded everyone how skilled she is. she is a lawyer. she understands constitutional law in this country as well as the national law. she's the best qualified in able to skills of being negotiate. it is the travesty of what happened in benghazi that i think it was very unprofessional and very undemocratic how the republican party tried to paint it is a very dangerous thing. some people do not want to have a military state in terms of how they run the embassies. it's very unfortunate that it but that is how the international goes. sabotaging the voting rights act, sabotaging the affordable health care act, making it look like something that it is when it isn't, everyone should be able to have health care. i don't know how many people can remember, but there was a time when you could not he den
in mississippi -- on instagramcture of the folks coming into that town hall in mississippi. also this evening, john boehner is holding a conference call with republicans. politico reports on that. the headline -- they write the republican leadership hold a conference this evening. topics expected to be discussed include immigration reform legislation, government funding and the debt ceiling, and those issues are expected to be top priorities in the fall. they said conference calls of this nature are typical house has an out of session for three weeks. they will be back in session in september. pennsylvania, republican line. caller: hi. my son is a student going to college. he is going to a private college. my husband and i are both middle-class americans. i am a teacher. the costs are daunting. done withe he is inool completely, $250,000 loans. he wants to be an orthopedic surgeon. >> right. caller: of course you when you talk to move ahead and break those barriers. foret a bill in the mail 30,000 something dollars every few months. loans is he taking on himself and how much are you and your
over the mississippi river, 16 feet more to go. i could watch this go down the nation's greatest river. it was an awesome view. the people that we serve know that we need to build the next great bridges and maintain the futures that all americans drive on. we're tremendously honored. we want to hear from our first guest here, congressman bill shuster. he oversees house action on all the transportation including maritime, highway, mass transit, and railroad. he represents pennsylvania's ninth congressional district and has searched on the committee since his first election to congress in 2000 one. welcome. >> thank you very much. thanks for that great example that i can take back to washington as to how the parties can work together. we need a good example. i really appreciate the opportunity to be here. at every state i have been to this is my first visit to wisconsin. penn state is going to prevail this year. i look at a couple of other governors. we look forward to those engagements. it is an opportunity for me to engage with governors. as i have traveled around the coeeg what other
's go down to where we're dealing with the rainy weather in mississippi. tupelo today, scattered storms in the forecast. yes, your blue suede shoes, elvis from tupelo, mississippi. the worst of the weather by far right over the top of kansas city. if you're down from interstate 70 or down to arkansas that's where the heavy rain will be from showers and storms. we're looking dry in the west. this weather pattern hasn't changed for three or four weeks. hot and dry in the west and in the east relatively cool and every now and then just like this mor >>> thanks, bill. 8:07 now. taking a live look at the golden gate bridge, what you can make out here. i can tell you right now the low clouds are going to be with us for most of the daylplp in san francisco, but you will get gel a couple of bits ofÑi sunshine. most comfortable conditions right around the innerq xdbay. 75 for instance in oakland. then the heshu is on as we head through tomorrow climbing by 90s return wednesday. upper 90ed by >>> that's your monday forecast. savannah, david. >> thank you so much. coming up next, trending, while
. a slight risk of strong storms in the upper mississippi river valley. tomorrow, we're looking at more wet weather moving into the northeast, mid-atlantic states, the upper ohio river valley. western half of the country sunny and hot. the heat extends down near the gulf. down >>> good wednesday morning to you. i'm meteorologist christina loren. temperatures are pretty comfortable out there right now. we are in the upper 50s, low 60s, live look at san jose shows you we still have clouds overhead. that natural ac moving all the way inland this morning, means a cooler afternoon. as a result, 70 degrees. today, in san francisco, a little bit cooler than average and temperatures are going to continue to drop off as we head through the nix couple of days. 87 degrees by thursday. up to 91 degrees on friday. >>> don't forget. get that weather any time you need it. go to the weather channel on cable or weather.com online. >>> in the world of country music it does not get much bigger than dolly parton. she is a legendary singer and song writer and actress and entrepreneur. she shared big news with w
to the ozark hills and wright county, douglas, to the banks of the mississippi river, one of the largest concerns that my constituents have is the uncertainty surrounding the affordable care act. individuals are concerned about the relationship with their doctor and what their costs are going to be. businesses are left with the tremendous uncertainty. they are understaffed because they are afraid to hire additional employees and they're also firing employees just to fall below the 50 individual threshold. the effects of the affordable care act are adversely affecting the health care and jobs and the folks across this great country. that is why i'm offering my amendment to revise the definition of major regulations to include any regulation under the affordable care act with over 3,000 pages of federal regulations already issued and many more to follow, congress must prevent this widely unsupportive law from causing further damage to our health care system. mr. speaker, there is broad partisan opposition to the affordable care act. the administration has demonstrated its own certainty thr
direction. florida, georgia, michigan, mississippi. these are states that have been difficult to target. i think over time you want to see how the numbers do. the concern for some time is these children had about a five-time likelihood of growing up to be obese adults as well. the problem is coming. this is the first time we have seen sustained improvement. >> the states are all over the country. it's not concentrated in one region at all. is there a reason, a cause for h this drop at this point? >> we're not entirely sure. we asked the same question. >> of course. >> i would say this is the kitchen sink mentality. the obesity epidemic, throw everything at the problem to see what sticks. that was good probably. the hard part is trying to figure out what worked. one clue is ta the low income children being affected points to federal subsidy programs as a possible cause, a benefit. wic and food stamp programs have regulated what people can buy to eat. much more healthy buying going on. decrease ing sugary drinks. also breastfeeding. there is a sustained effort. it makes a difference. childre
, your thoughts on the president's remarks yesterday. west mississippi, independent line. caller: i completely agree with the president. mr. snowden is not a patriot. one of the most important thing is facing our country now is this whole issue of fiber security. fibrous security is more important to our nation than the budget deficit problem. it is more important than our dependence on foreign oil. we have to be more aggressive with our cyber security protection. when have to be more aggressive with regard to battling against these groups who want to break into our cyber systems that control everything from our financial markets to our power grids and everything else. houston,ther troy from texas. republican line. caller: thank you for taking my call. i think he is a patriot. the government cannot listen to every phone call and every conversation we have. that information is our private property. we should be able to sell it as we see fit. cyber security is no excuse for setting up being cut or a police state. this is a country and it seems like he is a patriot to me. host: suzanne
for a mississippi california girl, the latest on the man underhunt for the alleged abductor and suspected killer. >>> ex-humaning the truth, researchers will dig up secret graves at a florida reform school. what is behind the new efforts to uncover this school's deadly history? >>> also the american town where a 4-year-old, there is he, the 4-year-old who is now mayor again. you're watching msnbc. my mother made the best toffee in the world. it's delicious. so now we've turned her toffee into a business. my goal was to take an idea and make it happen. i'm janet long and i formed my toffee company through legalzoom. i never really thought i would make money doing what i love. [ robert ] we created legalzoom to help people start their business and launch their dreams. go to legalzoom.com today and make your business dream a reality. at legalzoom.com we put the law on your side. at truecar.com, we offer our users... guaranteed upfront savings. the result? truecar users save... over $3,000... on average. save time, save money, and never overpay. visit truecar.com if you've got it, you know how hard
opportunity. let me conclude with this. generations, if this is 20th-century mississippi -- or 20th-century mali, young people have risked their safety and given their lives to give the -- get the education that has opened their potential. she spoke to and for the world's children. her message was clear. we want school and education for will child, and we continue the journey to our destination of these and education. nobody can stop us. we will speak up for our rights and bring change to our voice. all of you are helping to answer that call. i thank you for your service and your commitment, your creativity and courage. let's work together in individual nations and around the world until there are no more >> to fall through, no more barriers to run into and no more threats to their safety as they pursue their education and their dreams. if you want peace, work for justice, it has been said. we know this cuts to the root of if we wantallenge -- justice and peace, we must work for education. thank you so much, and i am happy to take your questions. [applause] >> is that working? mayb
. that is a long time in coming. it is beginning at this time. >> headers on the phone from jackson,, mississippi. what is your question? >> i would like to know who ran against james k. polk when he as running for president and did sarah polk play the part? >> polk runs against henry clay from kentucky. clay had run twice again before this. he thinks it is his turn. he expects it will be a cake walk, because nobody has heard of jim spoke. he makes a number of mistakes during the campaign, and in the end, in a very close vote, clay loses to polk. oddly enough, he carries polk's home state. >> the issue of a presidential campaign at that time, very different from what we see today. it was considered a proper for the candidate to be called to office. active campaigning went to state offices like the governor. the candidates did not show up at the nominating conventions, afterwards when the were drafted and accepted the nomination, air with letters and the editor, but very little stump -- no stumping at all. sarah was her husband's campaign manager for his congressional campaign and gubernatorial ca
at birmingham and mobs in mississippi. they sat down at lunch counters so others could stand up. they marched and they organized. remember dr. king did march from selma to montgomery -- he didn't speak by himself, he didn't -- there were thousands marching with him and before him and thousands more that did the dirty work that precede it had march. the successful strategies were litigation, organization, mobilization, and coalition. all aimed at creating a national constituency for civil rights. sometimes it is the simplest of these. >> another civil rights icon, president, founder of rain bo push coalition, the reverend esse l. jackson, sr. >> today we appeal to have mercy upon our plee. i was blessed to be here 50 years ago. thank god for the journey, 50 years of tragedy and try umple. there was blood in the amplete we marched in 63. i was with him and a band of warriors as he felt the agony of the might mare approaching in memphis. the pendulum swung between hope and hopelessness, he celebrated the joy of our progress, the freedom from barberism and the right to vote. lebrate the joy of pr
north georgia, mississippi, we'll have storms. we'll dry it out in areas like missouri who desperately need it. we leave you with the shot of washington, d.c. let's get the ball rolling. along the jersey shore, coca-cola is partnering with local businesses and the seaside heights business improvement district to restore the historic boardwalk, welcoming beach lovers back with a refreshed and revitalized place to get out, get moving, and have some fun in the sun. it's part of our goal to inspire more than three million people to rediscover the joy of being active this summer. see the difference all of us can make... together. the last thing i want is to feel like someone is giving me a sales pitch, especially when it comes to my investments. you want a broker you can trust. a lot of guys at the other firms seemed more focused on selling than their clients. that's why i stopped working at my old brokerage and became a financial consultant with charles schwab. avo: what kind of financial consultant are you looking for? talk to us today. [ laughing ] ...is the crackle of the campfire. it c
above mississippi. >>> and apple co-founder steve wozniak offering his review of "jobs" with ashton kutchers ahis former partner. steve likes ashton better in "that '70s show" let's just say. >>> futures lower after the longest losing streak since december for stocks. the dow down for four consecutive trading days losing 440 points. >>> the irs sent out letters to 20,000 small business owners over the past year notifying them of possible income underreporting. the irs thinks businesses that get most of their sales through credit cards may be underreporting their cash transactions. cnn money has a list of places where homes are the most affordable and your income goes the farthest. top, altemon springs, florida. >> we norman hat tan. we had red flag warnings in the area, talking about strong winds and dry lightning, eventually we'll get more moisture and see rain hit the ground and that will bring relief toward the second half of the week but it will take some time. >>> rain, way too much of it, in the southeast, one to two inches of rain still possible, three to four inches possible
processing plant in mississippi a couple of miles from the state penitentiary, they have a program that allows prisoners to leave and make $6 per hour processing chickens. they said they have never had a prisoner last more than two days cleaning chickens. that they would rather be in their cells in prison than work in the chicken processing plant because it is such hard, dirty, nasty work. we are seeing the same thing in arizona. picking lettuce, there are no american workers lining up to do those jobs. host: a couple more tweets -- guest: if there were? oh, well, a dirtly littlesecret about immigration, if you wanted to come to the united states and clean a hotel room or work in a service sector that is not agriculture, there is no way for you to come to this country to work. there is especially no way for you to stay. we do not have a visa category that addresses these people. while we do have an agriculture program, it is small and difficult to use and many employers do not use it. in california they say that 70% of agriculture workers are here illegally and only 4% of the total
many different ways can you make cod? >> ainsley: then mississippi, then alabama. >> tucker: have you been to high land foreign grill outside birmingham? >> brian: is this a push back on the study? >> tucker: this is a push back. >> ainsley: how about drunkest state? what do you think it is? louisiana, florida, california? where is nevada on there. >> tucker: what about maine? come on. >> ainsley: the rudest state. come on! who did they ask? new york? >> tucker: yeah. that's the foulest area. >> ainsley: shocker. new york, new jersey, then california. >> brian: if you get a chance to see people in california, they do seem rude. nicest state, georgia, minnesota or hawaii? all nice people and nice looking states. >> tucker: they're all nice. the cost of insurance is rising with obamacare a lot. what if there was a way around that? meet the doctor who saved one patient $17,000 by not using his insurance. >> ainsley: then the next batman is revealed. the name that no one expected. that's coming up. too soft. too tasty. [ both laugh ] [ male announcer ] introducing progresso's new creamy a
a barge down the mississippi, tanker cars, or trucks. >> there's a story that was first report bid the hill newspaper saying that the e he on would likely be uld -- >> that's actedly not a new storyifment that came out a couple years ago and was investigated. and my understanding is there were no conflicts found. what you're starting to see is a recycling of a lot of events. keep in mind that executive order that was put in place that governs this entire process was put in place to expedite cross-border transportation facilities. instead of expediting it, this is now taking longer again, we could have built the empire state building five times by now, we completed world war ii in less time. so at some point you start to say, we've had four studies. we've had this, we've had that. at some point the question is has this policy really been high jacked or are we still on path? > eric from our democrat's line. >> we have environmental studies. we've also had practical xperience with spills. i don't know where o you're getting your safety record from, the 99.999%. if one of these pipelin
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